Energy Saving Tips for Winter

Is Your Home Ready For Winter?

 There's snow on the ground and in the forecast. Winter is here!

You could put in a new kitchen or buy a new TV, but doesn't a home that stays warmer and saves you money sound like a good idea? There are a lot of ways to improve the energy efficiency and comfort of you home, and some might be able to save you more than you think. Getting projects done before we are in the dead of winter is important so you can get ahead of those high energy bills. And don't forget, Energy Coaches at Walking Mountains are ready to help you figure out what is best for you and your home! 

Projects to consider:

  • Air Sealing & Insulation: These are projects best done together. Average cost is $3,000 with potential savings of $160 annually. 
  • Furnace or Boiler Replacement: Average cost is around $9,000, and savings can be anywhere from 20-35%
  • Crawlspace Conversion: This will create a warm pocket under the home. Average cost around $3,000 and potential savings of $150 annually.
Winter Tips (no blinds)

If these higher capitol projects are out of reach right now, there are other low to no-cost options that can help get you onto the path towards energy efficiency.

1) Install a Programmable Thermostat

With one of these, your heat will automatically adjust to lower temperatures when you're sleeping or away at work. This can save you 10-15% on heating costs!  

2) Tune and Clean Your Furnace

 Just like your car needs an oil change, it is important to keep your heating equipment in good running shape. This ensures it is running as efficiently as it can! 

3) Utilize the Sun

South facing windows are a fantastic resource to use during the day. Keep those blinds and curtains open to maximize solar heat gain! Be sure to close them at night to help keep the heat in.

Energy Programs at Walking Mountains is here to help! 

Connect With An Energy Coach

James Dilzell

Author: James Dilzell

Energy Programs Associate, Walking Mountains Sustainability.

https://www.walkingmountains.org/staff/james-dilzell-2/